Clitheroe Castle

Clitheroe CastleOriginally built as a defence, Clitheroe Castle was developed into a comfortable residence for Henry de Lacy in the 13th century. Later it became a gaol and a court. The castle was at one time moated, there was a chapel dedicated to St Michael and ancient documents mention an orchard below the castle. Several ghosts have been reported in the Castle at different times; a White Lady, an entire family, a maid, and a First World War soldier, but no-one can say who any of these apparitions were when they lived. Other people have reported strange smells, unexplained noises and areas of extreme coldness.

The buildings were somewhat damaged by troops in the 17th century and it may be this time period which gave rise to a story about the Devil… Only the ancient Norman keep now remains and in the Keep is a window which, it is said, was made by the Devil. He was not gentle about it – he threw rocks from nearby Pendle Hill until the hole in the wall was big enough to satisfy him. It was well-known that he also once walked the streets of Clitheroe, trying to persuade people to sell him their souls for three wishes. However, he was beaten, defeated by cleverness and trickery, and flew to a bridge, a mile to the south, where he disappeared. Ever since that day, the bridge has been known as Hell Hole Bridge. (There’s a very similar tale told about the Devil in Cockerham.  Seems he wasn’t as clever as he would have liked to think!)

Image © Copyright Alexander P Kapp and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

About LancashireFolk

Lancashire folklore, legends, ghosts, local history - author of 'Lancashire Folk' published by Schiffer Publishing Winter 2015 - 9780764349836 £17.50. 'Manchester Folk', covering Greater Manchester, coming in 2017!
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One Response to Clitheroe Castle

  1. Pingback: Clitheroe Castle | Mysterious Times

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